Global Support for a Strong Plastics Treaty

The results of this Greenpeace survey demonstrate that there is overwhelming public support for the Global Plastics Treaty to cut plastic production, end single-use plastics and advance reuse-based solutions. Conducted in 19 countries with over 19,000 respondents, the survey shows strong support for cutting the production of plastic, at over 8 in 10 people (82%1), and for protecting biodiversity and the climate by cutting plastics production (at 80%1). As many as 9 out of 10 people (90%2) support a transition away from single-use plastic packaging to reusable and refillable packaging, while 75%1 support a ban on single-use plastic. Likewise, 80% of people are concerned3 about the impacts of plastic on the health of their loved ones and 84% of parents are concerned about these impacts on the health of their children.

The high level of support for ambitious action on plastics is similar across all the countries surveyed, but particularly strong in most of the Global South countries where plastic pollution levels are higher. Support for all the statements was well above 50%, with the lowest percentage still at 60%1, in support of a statement that lobbyists from the fossil fuel industry and chemical industries should not be allowed to take part in negotiations, for the Global Plastics Treaty to be successful.

The overwhelming show of public support sends a strong message to the Governments negotiating the Global Plastics Treaty—the public expects political leaders to address pollution from the full life cycle of plastics, by cutting plastic production and banning single-use plastics. A failure to do so will carry political consequences.

  1. ‘Strongly agree’ and ‘Somewhat agree’ responses combined
  2. ‘Essential’, ‘Very important’, and ‘Fairly important’ responses combined
  3. ‘Very concerned’ and ‘Somewhat concerned’ responses combined

A site known as Fencelinedata.org shifts the balance of power from chemical producers to journalist, community members, and advocates that can hold them accountable.

This tool, a project of DataKind, Until Justice Data Partners, Material Research L3C, and Public Health Watch, represents a major advance in data accessibility: It makes multiple federal databases available in one place, allowing users to avoid government websites that can be difficult to navigate and interpret.

Find out which companies in your neighborhood are polluting and what harmful chemicals they are releasing into the environment. FencelineData.org provides facility-level information about environmental violations and toxic-chemical and greenhouse-gas pollution from tens of thousands of facilities that report to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Does Amazon’s plastic packaging actually get recycled? Researchers with U.S. PIRG placed trackers in bundles of Amazon shipping materials and put them in store drop bins to see where they ended up.

Plastic packaging from e-commerce is a major producer of plastic pollution, generating 3.4 billion pounds of plastic globally in 2021 alone. Amazon is a significant contributor to this number, generating an estimated 709 million pounds of plastic just in 2021. Amazon claims much of its plastic packaging is recyclable, and offers a store drop-off system for its film packaging. Yet researchers found no evidence any of its plastic packaging is being recycled. The results paint a far different picture of what actually happens to Amazon’s plastic packaging when it is returned for “recycling.”

BIPOC in ECJ is a searchable platform uniting diverse speakers, specialists, potential hires, board members, advisory group, and steering committee members of environmental justice.

BIPOC in ECJ, or “Black, Indigenous, and People of Color in Environmental and Climate Justice”, serves as a directory for members of a diverse community involved in just environmental and climate justice, and other specialties.

In this database, those who wish to be involved can check the community calendar for events, future and past. Recruiters can submit a job description so they can get in touch with the best possible candidates. BIPOC in ECJ offers other helpful justice resources, including a blog, community calendar, and toolkit.

The European Environment Bureau (EEB) and ChemSec published the results of an initiative showcasing Europeans leaders testing positive for ‘Forever chemicals’ in their bodies. The detected levels of PFAS in the leaders’ bodies do not significantly differ from the average European, illustrating that no one is immune to PFAS—not even key European Officials. 

Leaders across EU nations, including Vice-Presidents, members of European Parliament, and others tested positive for at least 13 PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) “forever chemicals.” PFAS chemicals are linked to a wide range of severe health issues such as cancer, infertility, birth defects, and immune system disruptions. These results highlight failing chemical control measures and emphasize the pressing necessity of regulating hazardous materials to which people are exposed, in Europe and beyond.

Although Europe has some of the strictest chemical control policies in the world, it has not yet fully banned PFAS—a chemical category including more than 10,000 substances.

Top plastic pollution researcher Martin Wagner at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology writes, “A United Nations-backed agreement to end plastic pollution is within reach — but only if scientists, civil society and businesses unite against powerful vested interests.”

Wagner argues that the global plastic treaty currently under negotiation, if crafted intelligently and agreed upon by world leaders, could significantly reduce global reliance on fossil fuels and plastics. This, he writes, could diminish human and planetary exposure to hazardous chemicals and harmful plastic particles. But to get there, negotiators and observers will have to agree that vested interests with the fossil fuel and plastics industries should not guide the process.